Post Stitches

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Front post and back post stitches are useful for creating texture in crochet, so it’s a must-learn for ambitious crocheters. This technique is easy to learn, but creates very interesting effects, often associated with complex patterns. They’re also known as raised stitches, or relief stitches.

How does it work?

Relief stitches differ from basic stitches only by the place through which the hook is inserted, but that’s exactly the point. You work it around the stitch from the previous row, so differently than regular stitches. Depending on the way we insert the hook, we create a relief stitch hooked either from the front or the back. Any basic stitch may become a relief stitch, so it’s very versatile.

How is it called in a pattern?

If you encounter relief stitch in a diagram (chart), it will look like your basic stitch symbol (for example, double crochet symbol), but with a hook at the bottom. The direction of the hook indicates the kind of crochet stitch required, so they work like this:

  • Hook pointing to the left – hooked through the front of the crochet piece
  • Hook pointing to the right – hooked through the back of the crochet piece

Learn more about reading diagrams (charts) in this post -> coming soon!

If you follow a written pattern, you will most probably find these universal abbreviations:

  • FP – front post
  • BP – back post

Let’s see it in an example – let’s say, I want you to make three front post double crochets. I will write it like this:

3 fp dc

If I want you to make one back post single crochet, you will see this:

1 bp sc

Learn more about reading written patterns in this post -> coming soon!

See how it’s made

You can apply this technique to any basic stitch you know, so just keep in mind the way in which you insert the hook. We may use relief stitches for various projects, and achieve lovely structural details – such as ribbing, for example.

examples

There are so many amazing projects featuring this technique, because crocheters come up with new ideas everyday. These few examples show how versatile post stitches are, and how many beautiful things you can do with it.

 

Post stitches in Free Crochet Patterns

There are many free patterns that use post stitches, so if you wish to learn it for free, there’s a lot of resources. One of my favorite projects are home accessories, because they add a lot to any interior. Take a look at examples below and find what suits you best, but don’t be intimidated – some of these patterns are easier than other.

Brioche Infinity Pillow by Tatsiana Kupryianchyk

This lovely pillow by Tatsiana is the ultimate post stitch project, because it uses it in a regular structural pattern throughout the whole piece.

Brioche Infinity Pillow by Tatsiana Kupryianchyk

Check out this free pattern on lillabjorncrochet.com.

 

Sunny Spread by Ellen Gormley

This lovely spread uses post stitches to create three-dimensional rays of sun, so take a look at the pictures below and see if you like it.

Sunny Spread by Ellen Gormley, this version by victoriaoc

Check out this free pattern on ravelry.com, or see this version by victoriaocy on ravelry.com.

 

Wispweave Square by Draiguna

Delicate ornamental pieces by Draiguna are very popular, and you can find lots of different shapes available. These complex patterns look detailed thanks to post stitches, too, because the center is more prominent.

Wispweave Square by Draiguna

Check out this free pattern on draiguna.com.


Lost in Time Shawl by Johanna Lindahl

Sometimes designers introduce post stitches only in a small part of the project, but they play a big role nonetheless.

Lost in Time Shawl by Johanna Lindahl

Check out this free pattern on mijocrochet.se, or take a look at this beautiful version by Svetlana Tomina on ravelry.com.

 

Sakura Face Scrubbies by Krisztina Anna Matejcsok-Edomer

Looking for a quick project, but also an opportunity to practice post stitches? Try these cute face scrubbies by Krisztina Anna, because they make a great gift set, too.

Sakura Face Scrubbies by Krisztina Anna Matejcsok-Edomer

Check out this free pattern on ravelry.com, or take a look at this cool version by mswhittaker23 on ravelry.com.

 

Sunset Cushions by Catherine Bligh

This structural pillow will be a fantastic addition to any interior, because you can make it in any colors you like.

Sunset Cushions by Catherine Bligh

Check out this free pattern on ravelry.com.

 

Post stitches in Paid Crochet Patterns

Post-Modern Post-Stitch Seahorse by Terry Finer

Post-Modern Post-Stitch Seahorse by Terry Finer

Purchase this pattern on etsy.com.

 

Carnival Of Flowers CAL by Buttonnose Crochet

Carnival Of Flowers CAL by Buttonnose Crochet

Purchase this pattern on nanascraftyhome.com.

 

Sakura Cabled Mandala by Tatsiana Kupryianchyk

Sakura Cabled Mandala by Tatsiana Kupryianchyk

Purchase this pattern on ravelry.com.

 

Arwen by Zoya Matyushenko

Arwen by Zoya Matyushenko

Purchase this pattern on ravelry.com.

 

Idunn by Zoya Matyushenko

Idunn by Zoya Matyushenko

Purchase the pattern on ravelry.com.

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Hi! My name is Kate, and I'm a crafter and textile designer. I come from a family of makers who never stop creating. Crochet, knitting, sewing... Handmade is definitely my thing! Make yourself at home and let's create something together!

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